Geek Mountain State Presents: Vermont Tales of Adventure!

Vermont-Tales-of-Adventure
Geek Mountain State is pleased to announce the next installment of the Vermont SF Writer’s Series: Vermont Tales of Adventure!, which will take place on Friday, February 27th at The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction at 6:00pm. Authors included in this event are Joe Citro, Bruce Hesselbach, Marko Kloos, Fred Lerner, Brian Staveley and Sarah Stewart Taylor.
This event follows a very successful year in which hundreds of listeners listened to dozens of Vermont storytellers in places such as Quarterstaff Games, Phoenix Books, The Fletcher Free Library and the headquarters for the Burlington Writer’s Workshop. The first event of 2015 took place at the Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.
The Center for Cartoon Studies is a college that centers on the creation and dissemination of comics, graphic novels and other manifestations of the visual narrative. CCS programs include a two-year Master of Fine Arts Degree, One- and Two-Year Certificates in Cartooning, and annual summer workshops. The school is located in the historic downtown village of White River Junction, Vermont.
Citro
Joe Citro is an award-winning writer, an expert in New England weirdness, and a well-known collector of offbeat Vermontiana. In a series of novels such as Shadow Child, Deus-X: the Reality Conspiracy, and others, he has taken readers on a dark and sinister journey through a landscape more typically portrayed with blue skies, maple trees, and white picket fences. His short story “Snays” appeared in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, “Soul-Keeper”, was made into a movie, and three of his novels have been under film option (so far with no film). His ten “books-that-might-not-be-fiction” include the first-ever collection of Vermont strange-but-true tales, Green Mountain Ghosts, Ghouls, and Unsolved Mysteries and the visually gorgeous collaboration with artist Steve Bissette (Swamp Thing, etc), The Vermont Monster Guide. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, he lectures widely, and for more than ten years he has chronicled the oddities of local history on public radio.
bruce
Bruce Hesselbach is an attorney who lives in Newfane, Vermont. His first novel, Perpetual Motion, first published in 2013, is a steampunk tale, set in Switzerland and Germany from 1876 to 1889, in which a time traveler’s daughter falls in love with a dangerous young inventor threatening to help Germany win the Great War. Bruce’s first book of New Formalist poetry, Roving Enchantments, was published in May 2014 by White Violet Press. Previously Bruce wrote High Ledges, Green Mountains, a memoir about hiking Vermont’s 270 mile Long Trail.
He is the author of nine published short stories. To date, 62 of his poems have been published in the small presses. He graduated cum laude from Yale in 1972 with a BA in English, and received a JD in 1975 from Villanova Law School. His favorite reading matter includes travel and exploration, history, fantasy and steampunk.
Marko
Marko Kloos was born and raised in Germany, in and around the city of Münster. In the past, he has been a soldier, bookseller, freight dock worker, and corporate IT administrator before he decided that he wasn’t cut out for anything other than making stuff up for a living. He is a graduate of the Viable Paradise SF/F Writers’ Workshop, and his first novel, Terms of Enlistment was self-published in 2013 and by 47North in 2014, and was followed by its sequel, Lines of Departure later that year. His next, Angles of Attack, is due out in April of this year, and his fourth book in the Frontlines series, Chain of Command, is set to be published in November 2015.Marko writes primarily science fiction and fantasy, his first genre love ever since his youth when he spent his allowance mostly on German SF pulp serials. He likes bookstores, kind people, October in New England, Scotch, and long walks on the beach with Scotch.

Marko lives in New Hampshire with his wife, two children, and roving pack of vicious dachshunds.

 
fred
Fred Lerner has been a librarian and bibliographer for more than forty-five years, and was one of the founders of the Science Fiction Research Association. His first book, Modern Science Fiction and the American Literary Community, was a scholarly study of science fiction’s changing reputation in America. A Bookman’s Fantasy collects some of his essays on science fiction, librarianship, and other areas of interest. The Story of Libraries: From the Invention of Writing to the Computer Age, though written for the general reader, has been adopted as a textbook in library schools in over a dozen countries. Translations have been published in Spanish, Turkish, and Chinese; and a second edition was published by Continuum in December 2009. His first published story, “Rosetta Stone” has been described by anthologist David Hartwell as “the only SF story I know in which the science is library science.”
Until his retirement in January 2014, he was Information Scientist at the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. As producer of the PILOTS Database, an online index to more than 50,000 publications on PTSD, he claims to have seen more literature on the subject than anyone on the planet. He lives with his wife Sheryl in White River Junction, Vermont.
Brian
After teaching literature, philosophy, history, and religion for more than a decade, Brian Staveley began writing epic fantasy. His first book, The Emperor’s Blades, was released in 2014, and his latest, The Providence of Fire was released earlier this year. He lives on a steep dirt road in the mountains of southern Vermont, where he divides his time between fathering, writing, husbanding, splitting wood, skiing, and adventuring, not necessarily in that order.
2012 author photograph of Sarah Stewart Taylor. (Photo by Jennifer Hauck)
Sarah Stewart Taylor (S. S. Taylor) is the author of the middle grade steampunk adventure series The Expeditioners, as well as other books for kids and grown-ups. She and her family live in Vermont.

 

RSVP here.

Rocket Talk Episode 39: Brian Staveley

Brian Staveley Emperor's Blades Providence of Fire

Brian Staveley has been in the news throughout this week, but we’ll share another link that involves him. Tor.com has recently instituted a podcast, and this week, Staveley is their guest:

In this episode of Rocket Talk, Justin interviews fantasy author Brian Staveley about what it was like to have one of the most heralded debuts of 2014 and how he’s adjusting to life in the community. The conversation covers some writing techniques, discussions about his first two books—The Emperor’s Blades and The Providence of Fire—and whether or not authors can have “the juice.”

Listen here.

Win a Copy of The Providence of Fire!

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Earlier today, we mentioned that Brian Staveley’s latest novel, The Providence of Fire, is now out in stores!

We’d like to give away a copy of the book courtesy of Tor books. To win, leave a comment on this post! We’ll e-mail the winner at the end of the week.

Here’s what the book is about:

Having learned the identity of her father’s assassin, Adare flees the Dawn Palace in search of allies to challenge the coup against her family. Few trust her, but when she is believed to be touched by Intarra, patron goddess of the empire, the people rally to help her retake the capital city. As armies prepare to clash, the threat of invasion from barbarian hordes compels the rival forces to unite against their common enemy.
Unknown to Adare, her brother Valyn, renegade member of the empire’s most elite fighting force, has allied with the invading nomads. The terrible choices each of them has made may make war between them inevitable.

Between Valyn and Adare is their brother Kaden, rightful heir to the Unhewn Throne, who has infiltrated the Annurian capital with the help of two strange companions. The knowledge they possess of the secret history that shapes these events could save Annur or destroy it.

Release Day for Providence of Fire

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The second book in Brian Staveley’s Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne series, The Providence of Fire, comes out today!

Here’s what it’s about:

The conspiracy to destroy the ruling family of the Annurian Empire is far from over.

Having learned the identity of her father’s assassin, Adare flees the Dawn Palace in search of allies to challenge the coup against her family. Few trust her, but when she is believed to be touched by Intarra, patron goddess of the empire, the people rally to help her retake the capital city. As armies prepare to clash, the threat of invasion from barbarian hordes compels the rival forces to unite against their common enemy.

Unknown to Adare, her brother Valyn, renegade member of the empire’s most elite fighting force, has allied with the invading nomads. The terrible choices each of them has made may make war between them inevitable.

Between Valyn and Adare is their brother Kaden, rightful heir to the Unhewn Throne, who has infiltrated the Annurian capital with the help of two strange companions. The knowledge they possess of the secret history that shapes these events could save Annur or destroy it.

You can purchase the book at all good bookstores!

Brian Staveley’s The Last Abbot: Unlocked

Last year, Brian Staveley issued a challenge to readers: he had hidden clues in a number of copies of his debut novel, The Emperor’s Blades, and scattered them around bookstores in the country, with instructions on what to do. With each discovered book, part of a story online was unveiled: The Last Abbot of Ashk’lan.

Now, the entire story has been unveiled, and you can read it here!

Press & Reviews for Providence of Fire

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Brian Staveley’s Providence of Fire is coming out next week, and already, reviews and coverage are starting to come in. Here’s a sample of what’s come out recently:

Staveley wrote a piece for Tor/Forge’s blog: Three Ekphrastic Dialogues; or NO DUAL WIELDING UNTIL BOOK THREE.

Tenacious Reader enjoyed the book:

The end of this book will leave you wanting to grab for the next one immediately, but it’s so good, I don’t recommend putting off reading it either. Just go read it. Deal with with the wait. You can’t forget how it ends, so don’t worry about that.

Niall Alexander on Tor.com also enjoyed it:

At the end of the day, I dare say I enjoyed The Emperor’s Blades. My reservations, however, came back to me in a flash when the time came to see about the sequel. By taking the better part of a hundred pages to begin, it doesn’t put its best foot forward, I’m afraid… but beyond that? Boy oh boy. The Providence of Fire stands as a lesson in a sense: that great things can spring from small beginnings.

abouttogetreal has an interview with Staveley:

Anyway, The Emperor’s Blades was definitely one of the best books I read in 2014 and I was pretty excited when Brian Staveley agreed to an interview. Coming from an academic background with a strong interest in poetry, Brian Staveley definitely brings a unique perspective to his writing. One of the first things that the reader will notice is that unlike alot of other personality-driven fantasy novels where the setting itself is not one of the main characters, is that the societies, religions, and history are all very well thought-out and not simply your generic medieval Western European culture with wizards and gnomes and whatnot thrown in for good measure, which helps keep the writer from having to do any serious world-building of their own. Brian Staveley also maintains a blog with a ton of great resources for an aspiring fantasy author. OK, enough from me. Let’s move on to the interview:

Finally, Dartmouth College has published an interview with Staveley:

When he is not blogging about epic fantasy or spending time outside in Vermont, author and blogger Brian Staveley ’98 works on his trilogy “Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne.” The second book in the series, “The Providence of Fire” comes out Jan. 13.

Read the interview here.

Providence of Fire gets Starred Kirkus Review

staveley_anderson_providence-of-fire

Kirkus Reviews is one of the major review outlets for books (disclaimer: I write a column for them), and Brian Staveley’s upcoming fantasy novel, The Providence of Fire just earned a starred review from them!

Following in the footsteps of George R.R. Martin, Joe Abercrombie and the like, Staveley doesn’t hesitate to treat his protagonists harshly, subjecting them to utter privation and pain, devastating betrayals and the vast uncertainty that results when long-distance communication between potential allies is impossible (ah, for the magical equivalent of a cellphone!).

Read the review “here.

Win a Copy of Providence of Fire!

staveley_anderson_providence-of-fire

Goodreads is giving away 10 copies of Brian Staveley’s upcoming novel, The Providence of Fire. Enter here.

Here’s what it’s about:

The conspiracy to destroy the ruling family of the Annurian Empire is far from over.

Having learned the identity of her father’s assassin, Adare flees the Dawn Palace in search of allies to challenge the coup against her family. Few trust her, but when she is believed to be touched by Intarra, patron goddess of the empire, the people rally to help her retake the capital city. As armies prepare to clash, the threat of invasion from barbarian hordes compels the rival forces to unite against their common enemy. Unknown to Adare, her brother Valyn, renegade member of the empire’s most elite fighting force, has allied with the invading nomads. The terrible choices each of them has made may make war between them inevitable.

Between Valyn and Adare is their brother Kaden, rightful heir to the Unhewn Throne, who has infiltrated the Annurian capital with the help of two strange companions. The knowledge they possess of the secret history that shapes these events could save Annur or destroy it.

You have until November 28th to enter.

New Books In Science Fiction Interviews Brian Staveley

staveley_anderson_providence-of-fire

New Books in Science Fiction interviews Brian Staveley, author of The Emperor’s Blades:

In his interview on New Books in Science Fiction and Fantasy, Staveley describes the three types of tension that power good storytelling: psychological, social, and environmental. “If you’re writing a mountaineering story,” he explains, “the psychological tension might be one character’s fear of heights, and the social tension might be that two of the characters on the expedition hate each other, and then the environmental tension would be that there are constant avalanches trying to destroy them. And I think the stories I like … combine all three of those.”

Listen to the podcast here.